Book of Hours (for use in Paris). In Latin...

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Book of Hours (for use in Paris). In Latin...

Book of Hours (for use in Paris).
In Latin and French, illuminated manuscript on parchment.
France, Paris, ca. 1460.
With seven miniatures by the Master of Coëtivy (active in Paris from 1450 to 1485) and a small illuminated medallion by an unidentified artist. 167 ff, preceded by a parchment leaf, a priori complete (the Hours of the Virgin are illustrated with a single miniature) [collation difficult as binding very tight, the first two quires (i2, ii12), followed by quires a priori of 8 leaves], gothic writing in brown ink, ruling in pale red ink (justification: 60 x 90 mm), text copied in 15 lines, headings in pale red, line ends in burnished gold and blue and pink paint with coloured highlights, initials in burnished gold on blue and dark pink background with white highlights (one line high), g. fol. 16, 21, 24v, 39v and passim), with seven large miniatures in curved format surrounded by illuminated borders on four sides.
Bound in 18th century full red morocco, spine with five ribbed bands, partitioned and decorated with flowers, with IHS [Ihesus] and MA [Maria] alternating in the inter-nerve bands, Duseuil-style decoration on the boards, framed with triple gilt fillet, fleurons at the outer corners of the central frame, monogram IHS inscribed in a crown of thorns stamped in the center of the upper board, monogram MA inscribed in a crown of thorns stamped in the center of the lower board, gilt garland on the edges, gilt and embossed edges. Inscription in ink on the upper counter-guard with a count of the miniatures and a proposal (erroneous) of dating in the 14th century: "On croit ces heures du temps du roy Jean en 1360". Hinged preservation box, half-garnet morocco, gilt lettering, red velvet lined interior (Label of "Brockmann, Binders, Oxford, England").
Very good condition, with a few tears or traces of oxidation (e.g. ff. 38v, 39). Joints a little rubbed, corners a little dull, a few small scratches on the lower cover, not serious.
Dimensions : 130 x 190 mm.
This book of hours is painted by the Master of Coëtivy, one of the main actors of the Parisian artistic life in the second half of the XV? century and who "can be considered the third painter of royal France of his time, after Fouquet and Barthélémy d'Eyck, because he brought truly original elements to the period of exceptional creation that was the middle of the 15th century" (N. Reynaud in Avril et Reynaud, Les manuscrits à peintures en France 1440-1520, Paris, 1993, p. 58).
The artist is named after the patron of a book of hours painted for the chamberlain of Charles VII, Olivier de Coëtivy, and his wife Marie de Valois (eponymous manuscript: Vienna, ÖNB, Cod. 1929; it should be remembered that it was Paul Durrieu who, in connection with the Coëtivy/Valois Hours, undertook a survey of manuscripts attributable to the person he identified as Henri de Vulcop (Durrieu, 1921)). He was an artist whose talent was also exercised in other fields, in particular by providing models and patterns for stained glass, sculpture and tapestry (the "petits patrons" or models of the Trojan War hanging are kept in the Louvre's graphic arts department).
Obviously trained in the North, the Master of Coëtivy worked in Paris, notably for the French court. In addition to some thirty manuscripts, this versatile painter produced cartoons for stained glass windows (notably for three windows in the church of Saint-Séverin in Paris). Nicole Reynaud has suggested that he be likened to Colin d'Amiens (also known as Nicolas d'Ypres), son of the illuminator André d'Ypres, who settled in Paris around 1450, where he is documented from 1461 to 1488. We know of a document from 1479 in which Colin d'Amiens is described as a "hystorian and illuminator, bourgeois of Paris" and which specifies that he is the son of André d'Ypres, himself, during his lifetime, "hystorian and illuminator" in Paris. Colin d'Amiens carried out "paintwork" at the funeral and burial of Charles VII (see Oget, 2017). On the Master of Coëtivy, see F. Avril and N. Reynaud, Les manuscrits à peintures en France 1460-1520, 1993, pp. 58-69; D. Thiébaut et al, Primitifs français, Découvertes et redécouvertes, 2004, pp. 97-102).
The various works and research on the Master of Coëtivy have revealed that this artist most certainly belonged to a triad of miniaturists, whose exact lineage remains uncertain, but whose stylistic links are clear. The first of these artists is the one named Le Maître de Dreux Budé (Andr
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